Thursday, September 14, 2017

Last week, I had to leave my microbe in the glucose tube and MSA plate so I could be 100% sure it’s a gram-positive bacterium. After the 24 hours, my results were confirmed. My bacteria was a gram positive bacterium known as Bacillus subtilis. 
After figuring out the bacteria, my next mission was to pick the type of Pseudomonas bacteria I want to work with for the WAESO project. The WAESO project is concerned with the role Pseudomonas bacteria plays in the breakdown of micro plastics, and how micro plastics affect us. For this session in the WAESO project, I will be working with Pseudomonas stutzeri. Pseudomonas stutzeri is the bacteria that breakdown bio-plastics, which are used in the medical industry. Therefore, by understanding how these bacteria break down the plastics and the effects it has, we can come to a conclusion that will prevent other complications. Below are the Pseudomonas bacteria we will be working on throughout the semester.








Thursday, September 7, 2017

Let the games begin. May the odds be ever in our favor *mockingjay whistle*...
This week was a lot more of a challenge than it was last week. After being provided with an unknown bacteria, I proceeded with the streaking method to figure out what my bacteria is. After leaving it in the incubator for 24 hours, I inoculated from the Petri dish to a microscope slide. Before that, however, I first drew a circle on the slide with a wax pencil, then made a drop DI water inside the circle. After that, i mixed the inoculated bacteria with the DI water. Then, I covered the slide with a paper towel and using wooden tongs, placed the slide on boiling water for 6 minutes; making drops of Malachite Green every 30 seconds. Malachite green is used to stain the potential spores of the bacteria, and the heat is needed to open up the spores. After the 6 minutes were up, I picked the paper towel up from the slide and rinsed the slide with DI water, then proceeded to add the Safranin and leave it for 60 seconds. The next step was to observe the slide under a microscope. After confirming the microbe had endospores, I used a MAC plate to confirm it is in fact gram positive bacteria. I did that by smearing some bacteria on the plate and leaving it in incubation for 24 hours. After confirming, I had to find out what the bacteria actually is so I Needed to perform one last test on a glucose tube and an MSA plate. Unfortunately, I wasn't able to find out today as I have to leave the microbe in the glucose tube and MSA plate for 24 hours in incubation. So stay tuned for final results...




Friday, September 1, 2017

This week was my first week in STEM. I haven't done much besides watch a lot of videos regarding safety and whatnot; along with reading some modules about research. Those above took me two sessions in the lab, and tomorrow will be my first day working on actual lab work. I have been assigned an unknown bacteria, and my first job, after reading the lab manual, is to do some streaking. Hopefully, a lot will be done by next week. I have also been given a notebook where I’ll record everything I do in the lab. Josh and Matt warned me to record EVERYTHING in a hilarious way. I doubt I will forget now J

Last week, I had to leave my microbe in the glucose tube and MSA plate so I could be 100% sure it’s a gram-positive bacterium. After the 24 ...